ASHRAE Publishes Energy Design Guide for Schools

Originally published by: HPAC MagazineFebruary 18, 2018

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A new publication aims to improve energy savings at K-12 school buildings, titled Advanced Energy Design Guide for K-12 School Buildings – Achieving Zero Energy.

Image result for Advanced Energy Design Guide for K-12 School Buildings – Achieving Zero Energy. images“This comprehensive guide was developed by a team of zero energy experts that bring building science and practical application together to create an achievable goal of zero energy schools,” said Paul Torcellini, project committee chair.

Those experts include ASHRAE, the American Institute of Architects, the Illuminating Engineering Society of North America and the U.S. Green Building Council.

The free guide builds upon the 50 per cent Advanced Energy Design Guide series, with updated recommendations.

It provides guidance for on-site renewable energy generation, design team hiring, simulation in design and construction and how process decisions affect energy use.

Performance goals in the guide are provided for all ASHRAE climate zones, in both site and source energy.

How-to tips are broken into specialty areas: HVAC, building and site planning, envelope, daylighting, electric lighting, plug loads, kitchens and food service, water heating and renewable generation.

Case studies and technical examples aim to illustrate achievable energy goals under typical construction budgets, as well as the technologies in real-world applications.

The guide also includes recommendations for conceptual phase building planning and siting, as well as strategies to reduce and eliminate thermal bridging through the building enclosure. www.ashrae.org/freeaedg.